Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Handwriting is Going Out of Fashion, But Let's at Least Remember How to Draw

THE TELEGRAPH
A drawing of Leonardo da Vinci 
Like handwriting, drawing may become an extinct talent. From the first days of mankind, with charcoal and ochre on cave walls, to our own generation, with funny caricatures in exercise books or letters home, drawing has been co‑natural with humanity. Even Queen Victoria seems a far less rigid figure once one has seen her sketch from 1842 of her toddler daughter chubbily unclothed and attempting to climb into a bath as high as a wheelie-bin. Writing can create pictures, but it would be a disaster to lose the power of the pencil, which has an extra dimension on which it can literally draw. [link]

See Wes Lang's New Paintings from a Just-Opened Show in Copenhagen

GQ STYLE MAGAZINE
By Editors
Unknown Ballad, 2016
COPENHAGEN---In our profile of L.A.-based painter Wes Lang from the fall issue of GQ Style, Lang notes that ninety percent of the time, “people have to meet me to get my pieces.” That’s true, but right now we’re in one of those ten-percent zones: The artist has just opened a show of new work at Eighteen Gallery in Copenhagen. Titled The Believer after the 1964 John Coltrane album, the show is made up of four brand-new large-scale paintings made this year at the artist’s Boyle Heights studio in L.A. Each painting gets its own wall in the gallery’s white cube, creating what Lang called, in a text message, “a meditation room.” [link]

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Getty to Acquire "Virgin with Child, St. John the Baptist, and Mary Magdalene" by Parmigianino

ARTDAILY
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CALIFORNIA---The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today its intention to acquire Virgin with Child, St. John the Baptist, and Mary Magdalene (about 1530-40) by Parmigianino (Italian, 1503-1540), one of the most celebrated painters of the Italian Renaissance. Extremely well-preserved, the painting is a supreme example of the artist’s mature Mannerist style and represents sixteenth-century painting at its finest. The acquisition is subject to an export license being granted by the Arts Council England. The export application is being filed by the seller’s representative, Sotheby’s, on the Getty’s behalf. [link]