Saturday, July 15, 2017

Joan of Arc’s awe upon receiving a vision from the Archangel Michael.

RELIGION NEWS SERVICE
By Kimberly Winston
“Jeanne d’Arc écoutant les voix” by Eugene Thirion in 1876 depicts Joan of Arc’s awe upon receiving a vision from the Archangel Michael.
CHICAGO---She was young, illiterate and had power for less than two years. But when she died on a pyre in 1431, she achieved an immortality in art and literature that surpasses all of her contemporaries — kings, popes, knights, priests and courtiers. She, of course, is Joan of Arc, the French teenage country girl who, through her extreme faith, mystic visions and what must have been an astonishing amount of personal charisma, led French troops to a string of glorious victories against the invading English. She was eventually captured and tried for heresy. Now, a new photography show at the Loyola University Museum of Art tries to recapture something of the real Joan — or “Jehanne,” as she signed her name. [More]
Loyola University Museum of Art: “Searching for Jehanne — The Joan of Arc Project” (July 1, 2017 – October 21, 2017); 820 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL; 312.915.7600; luc.edu/luma
Chicago-based photographer Susan Aurinko's "I was born in the villiage of Domyemy37"