Friday, November 3, 2017

Exuberant circles hark back to another era

THE WASHINGTON POST
By Mark Jenkins
Works from Linling Lu’s series of minimalist yet exuberant pictures “One Hundred Melodies of Solitude” are on display at Hemphill Fine Arts as part of the “Linling Lu” exhibition. Some of the circles in the series are punctuated by unexpected touches, such as the white pith of “No. 112,” above. (Linling Lu/Hemphill Fine Arts)
WASHINGTON, DC---The concentric-circle paintings that Kenneth Noland and Jasper Johns began making in the 1950s were often called “targets.” Linling Lu, their successor as a maestro of orbiting bands of color, has a more elaborate term. She calls her ongoing series of minimalist yet exuberant pictures “One Hundred Melodies of Solitude.” Linling Lu is on display at Hemphill Fine Arts, a gallery that often shows art by Washington colorists in the spirit of Noland and his D.C. colleague, Morris Louis. The kinship between Lu and Noland is clear. (The link to Johns is weaker.) But Lu’s works differ from their 1950s predecessors in significant ways. [More]
“No. 122,” center, in Linling Lu’s “One Hundred Melodies of Solitude” series, at Hemphill Fine Arts through Dec. 17. (Matthew Kleinrock Photography/Hemphill Fine Arts)