Monday, April 11, 2016

Review: Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan

THE HUFFINGTON POST
By Kim Dramer
Nyoirin Kannon Kamakura Period, early 14th-century Japanese cypress (hinoki) with pigment, gold powder and cut gold leaf (kirikane). Courtesy of The Wall Street Journal
NEW YORK---"Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan" at Asia Society Museum, is a small exhibition presenting big changes in the art of Japan. On display are powerful works in every sense of the word. These are works commissioned, executed and embellished to bring benefits to the patron, the worshipper and the artist alike. Statues were designed to form a karmic bond with the worshipper, bring merit and benefits to the living, ease the suffering of those in hell and free the faithful from the cycle of reincarnation. [link]

Asia Society of New York: "Kamakura: Realism and Spirituality in the Sculpture of Japan" (Ends May 8, 2016); 725 Park Avenue, New York, NY; (212)288-6400; asiasociety.org