Friday, June 17, 2016

Alfonse Borysewicz’s Lonely Struggle Gives Catholic Art a Modern Face

RELIGION NEWS SERVICE
By David Van Biema
The first version of “Triduum II,” a painting by Alfonse Borysewicz. Photo courtesy of Alfonse Borysewicz
NEW YORK---Whenever Alfonse Borysewicz addresses a fresh canvas, a daunting set of issues stares back at him. First, there is the fact that Borysewicz is painting from faith, when, for the most part, it doesn’t pay. Few galleries and museums are interested in explicit, non-ironic religious art. It can be hard to find a place to show, let alone to sell. Then there is his Roman Catholicism. No other Western religion has produced such a rich legacy of artistic inspiration and ideas; but none exerts the same kind of anxiety of influence, described by one journalist as “the insane, neutron-star gravitational power of Catholic artistic tradition.” (In October, Borysewicz’s will show at the Dadian Gallery at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C.) [link]
Alfonse Borysewicz, who paints from faith, is Roman Catholic. Photo courtesy of Alfonse Borysewicz
The fifth version of “Triduum II,” a painting by Alfonse Borysewicz. Photo courtesy of Alfonse Borysewicz