Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Art Review: Martin Luther broke Europe in two, and Albrecht Dürer painted it back together

LOS ANGELES TIMES
By Christopher Knight, Art Critic
Albrecht Durer, "Portrait of Jakob Muffel (detail)," 1526, oil on panel transferred to canvas (LACMA
CALIFORNIA---Martin Luther (1483-1536) had planned to become a humdrum lawyer, acceding to his father’s wishes. Instead, he broke Europe in two. To mark the transformative aftermath of the event, one of the most far-reaching in European history, several American museums are mounting exhibitions. Prominent among them is the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The newly opened “Renaissance and Reformation: German Art in the Age of Dürer and Cranach” is a tightly organized, deeply absorbing overview of a subject extraordinary in its complexity. [link]

Los Angeles County Museum of Art: “Renaissance and Reformation: German Art in the Age of Dürer and Cranach” (Though March 26, 2017); 5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A.; (323) 857-6000;  lacma.org
Lucas Cranach the Elder, "The Pharaoh's Hosts Engulfed in the Red Sea (detail)," 1530. (LACMA)