Saturday, June 24, 2017

Art Review: From Cuba, a Stolen Myth

THE NEW YORK TIMES
By Holland Cotter
“La Cena” (“The Supper”), from 1991, which depicts a version of the Christian “Last Supper,” replaces the Jesus figure with the princess Sikán. Credit Michael Nagle for The New York Times
NEW YORK---Late last week, the Trump administration announced that it would be re-abnormalizing the relationship between the United States and Cuba. A few days earlier, El Museo del Barrio in Manhattan opened “NKame: A Retrospective of Cuban Printmaker Belkis Ayón,” reminding us exactly how much we have to gain from a free exchange of cultural energy with our island neighbor. Most of the narratives are derived from the Afro-Cuban religion called Abakuá, which came to the island in the 18th century with slaves arriving from what is now Nigeria and Cameroon. Their religion struck deep roots and is still practiced there. (“NKame” means “greeting” or “praise” in the Abakuá language.) [More]

El Museo del Barrio: “NKame: A Retrospective of Cuban Printmaker Belkis Ayón” (Ends November 5, 2017); 1230 5th Ave, New York, NY; 212-831-7272; elmuseo.org
A study for “La Cena” (1991), in bright colors. The final version is in black, white and tones of gray. Credit Michael Nagle for The New York Times