Saturday, July 7, 2018

The transformative nature of the photographs of Diane Arbus

THE NEW YORK TIMES 
By James Estrin
“Boy with a straw hat waiting to march in a pro-war parade, N.Y.C. 1967.” Credit The Estate of Diane Arbus
John P. Jacob first saw Diane Arbus’s work in 1980 while taking a college photo class to help him in his chosen career of architectural preservation. The effect of her images was so powerful that he dreamed about them every night for the next week. He then decided to dedicate his life to photography, eventually becoming the curator of photography at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Her images brought Mr. Jacob and Mr. Selkirk together in the making of “Diane Arbus: A Box of Ten Photographs,” published recently by Aperture and the Smithsonian American Art Museum to accompany an exhibition at the museum. Mr. Jacob wrote the essay for the book and curated the exhibition, which runs through January. Mr. Selkirk, who is the only person to have printed Ms. Arbus’s negatives since her death in 1971, was a source for Mr. Jacob. [More]
“A woman with her baby monkey, N.J. 1971.” Credit The Estate of Diane Arbus