Thursday, October 4, 2018

David Hockney wouldn’t paint the Queen. But he made her a stained-glass window.

THE NEW YORK TIMES
By Farah Nayeri
David Hockney in his London living room in September. On his right is a facsimile of the of a stained- glass window he designed, which was formally dedicated at Westminster Abbey on Tuesday.Credit Suzanne Plunkett for The New York Times
LONDON---On a drizzly September morning, David Hockney sat in his skylit London living room, puffing on a cigarette. The walls were covered with his art: framed self-portraits, tender etchings of his dogs, and a large, brightly colored composite photograph. Leaning against one wall was a poster-sized image of his latest creation: a stained-glass window for Westminster Abbey to commemorate the 65th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth’s reign. Measuring 28 feet by 12 feet, the “Queen’s Window” — which was inaugurated on Tuesday — represents a hawthorn, a thorny floral shrub, blooming in a joyous profusion of reds, blues, greens and yellows. “The hawthorn is celebratory: It’s as though champagne had been poured over bushes,” said Mr. Hockney, 81. [More]
Measuring 28 feet by 12 feet, the “Queen’s Window” represents a hawthorn, a thorny floral shrub, in bloom. Credit Victoria Jones/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images