At the Wadsworth Atheneum, Art by African-Americans Rejoices in the Sacred

THE BOSTON GLOBE
By Cate McQuaid
John Biggers's "Band of Angels: Weaving the Seventh Word" from 1992-93.COURTESY JOHN T. BIGGERS ESTATE/VAGA AT ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NY
HARTFORD — “Afrocosmologies: American Reflections" sits like a beating heart at the juncture of several major historical arteries: religion, art, and American history. The sweeping exhibition on three floors of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art revolves around African-American spirituality. It’s a giant theme. Cosmologies make sense of the world, and African-American belief systems contend with the kidnapping and enslavement of Africans brought to America as chattel, followed by generations of oppression. Making some sense of that senselessness requires grief, community, and a muscular faith. [More]

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art: “Afrocosmologies: American Reflections" (Through January 20, 2020); 600 Main St., Hartford, C.T.; 860-278-2670; www.thewadsworth.org
Carl Joe Williams's "Waiting."COURTESY PETRUCCI FAMILY FOUNDATION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART

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