Sunday, July 12, 2020

RELIGIOUS ART | NEWS OF WEEK - Jacob Lawrence

ALPHA OMEGA ARTS
By Gregory & Ernest Disney-Britton
Panel 28, 1956, painting location unknown. © The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy of Lucia | MarquandAt the Peabody, it is display with table of immigrants admitted from all countries: 1820 to 1840—115,773. 
Before COVID-19, we debated African American vs. Black or ALAANA (African, Latino, Asian, Arab, Native American) vs. people of color. Now, we consider BIPOC as The New York Times capitalizes Black for the first time. This week, a young man asked, "Who is your favorite artist of the Black Arts Movement? (1960s)" We named Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000), an artist rooted in the 1930s New Negro/Harlem Renaissance. An exhibition of his missing work is reopening this week at the Peabody Essex Museum, and that makes Jacob Lawrence, our artist of the week

NEWS OF 2008-2020 from across the USA, and around the world:
Are you an artist? Are you a collector? If you like what you see each week, please invite a friend to subscribe to our periodic e-newsletter. You can also follow us weekly on TwitterFacebook, or Soundcloud but only subscribers can vote for the Alpha Omega Prize. It is our annual recognition each November 1st of one artist's impact on religious dialogue in America.
Jacob Lawrence seated in front of Struggle panels 26 and 27, 1958. © Robert W. Kelley/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images.
JACOB LAWRENCE: THE AMERICAN STRUGGLE$ 45.00
Jacob Lawrence, We crossed the River at McKonkey’s Ferry 9 miles above Trenton . . . the night was excessively severe . . . which the men bore without the least murmur . . . —Tench Tilghman, 27 December 1776, Panel 10, 1954, from Struggle: From the History of the American People, 1954–56. Egg tempera on hardboard. Metropolitan Museum of Art. © The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Jacob Lawrence, Panel 1. ...Is Life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? – Patrick Henry, 1775, 1955. From Struggle Series, 1954–56. Egg tempera on hardboard. Collection of Harvey and Harvey-Ann Ross. © The Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation, Seattle/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photography by Bob Packert/PEM.