Sunday, August 23, 2015

RELIGIOUS ART | NEWS OF WEEK

ALPHA OMEGA ARTS
By TAHLIB, Curator
The Labyrinth in New Harmony, Indiana
With fewer than 800 residents today, New Harmony, Indiana was created by the Harmonists in the 1800s. These Christians believed that Adam was originally created with both sexes, and when the female portion was separated to form Eve, disharmony followed. The Harmonist solution was a life of celibacy while building a new utopia. This weekend, it's also been my birthday place. We spent the weekend taking leisurely strolls with our dog, daily scoops of artisan ice cream, and touring its little churches. There are a few unique art galleries, plenty of public art, and walking trails and labyrinths for prayers. The A&O logo was born here, and that's why the hedge "Labyrinth" is our NEWS OF WEEK.
In other religious art news from across the USA, and around the world:
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2 comments:

Ernest Disney-Britton said...

I adore you, O my God, and I love you will all my heart. We celebrated the Holy Eucharist today at St. Stephen's Episcopal Church in New Harmony. "Belief" as "trust" or "agreement," was the theme of today's sermon by Dr. Beth Make, the celebrant. Inspired by John 6:56-69, she challenged and inspired. She also invited me to join three parishioners for the August birthday blessings. It was unexpected, and I am totally grateful. This church also manages the nondenominational Roofless Church there in New Harmony, and we are grateful for that too. The benefits of this weekend, we owe to grace of God. I adore you, O my God.

Ernest Disney-Britton said...

Afterwards, I am three pounds heavier (190-193), and flood of New Harmony memories keep flooding back. It's the closest thing to this side of heaven for me. "They say the veil between heaven and earth is very thin here," Linda Warrum, a Town Council member told The Chicago Tribune. "You can't see it and you can't touch it, but you can feel it.” I still feel it three hours away.